Facing The Street and Making New Friends

In July, the Apis Institute organized another digital storytelling workshop for youth workers from around Europe designed to provide them with new tools of empowerment of vulnerable groups – by telling their stories through video and photo stories. Facing the Street training was held in Ljubljana, Slovenia, this time. We had participants from eight countries. Eleven of them, again a very diverse group in terms of their knowledge of photography, joined the photo workshop. This second time around I noticed that I still wasn’t entirely confident in what I said in Belgrade, but I trusted and believed in my participants’ abilities. Even those they still didn’t know they had. But I did.

It’s not a competition and it’s not imperative that the story they eventually produce is top level. We’re not just telling stories of people in various hardships of inclusion or exclusion from society. We’re creating new ones, too. We’re bringing our subjects back to light, including them, making them visible again, maing them matter, to us and to the society. As we photograph the chapters in their usual day, our visit is in fact a new chapter that will not be recorded or documented, but it will leave a significant fingerprint on their lives. By being true to them, being their friends who understand them sincerely, not for the sake of the story, and by developing a true and lasting relationship, we are giving them something that seems self-evident to us, but in their lives, it is rare. Somewhere to belong. A friend. Acknowledgement of their lives. Some of them may be too young to comprehend their lives in this way, but they do feel it, even if they can’t explain it in words. They feel that they are different, treated differently, that their lives are not entirely “normal”, and that they perhaps do not fit in.

I guess being on the brink of society, different and not fitting in, will in most cases urge the person to compensate and find a place to belong. Some find that compensation and self-realization in work, others try to express themselves through art, and some find friends in the only communities that take them – and that might even be drug addicts. It’s human nature to search for self-realization. And it can take a wrong turn when society excludes you.

There’s one most important advice I give to my participants at the workshop. “Primarily, you’re not going there for the story. You’re going there to make a new friend.” And that advice really sticks with such big-hearted people. The bonds they knit did not only produce the emotional and strong moments they captured with their cameras. As they documented the chapters in their friend’s daily life, they wrote a new one. They played soccer, climbed mountains, took daytrips, had lunch with their families, made bread and friends for life. They cried when they parted and they hugged when they reunited at the opening of the exhibition.

We’re not supposed to just take, that’s selfish. The storytelling of our kind is generally aimed at giving something back, but our reach and effect is limited. Which is why adding this deep personal aspect is fulfilling for all. It feels good. And it comes natural to people who come to our training.

Just like in Belgrade, many of the participants have never handled a camera before. Some of them wanted to get drunk and run away before showing their stories to me after their assignment. But I knew they had the story. If you make a connection, there’s no way you can go wrong. Which is why now I can honestly say that my words in Belgrade were spot on. I truly believe the best photo stories come from the heart.

The exhibition on display in Atrij ZRC SAZU in Ljubljana (Novi trg 2) is a very strong testimony of my beliefs. It is powerful, compelling and important not just for its power of inclusion, but for its role in giving the voice to people who want to be heard and be part of the society in an equal way. As pure quality of documentary photography is concerned it is dificult to believe that someone who has never handled a camera before can produce work at such level in just one day after a day of theoretical training and a lot of inspiration. You have to see it to believe it. And it is a treat to see these first time authors on par with a couple of experienced documentary photographers that participated as well. So if you have the opportunity to see it, go for it!

But the photo group was not the only one doing an amazing job. The video workshop lead by Romana Zajec and assisted by Yulia Molina and Borut Dolenec also produced some very important stories and with very compelling styles and approaches, seen on the big screen at the opening.

As for the workshop itself, it was quite a week. The photo group had a small lecture room in our Tropical Paradise (it’s how we called our hostel during the hottest days of summer), and the project manager Ivana Stanojev had a huge “office” next door. She’d call people in when she needed anything done. Her desk was in the middle of this big colorless room, mostly empty but big enough to play football in. It had an air of socialist or communist corporate manager office/interrogation room, huge with only a desk and two chairs. All she needed was a lamp she could shine in a person’s face sitting opposite to her. It felt like you’re going there to get fired. That was really funny, but totally unintended. Or was it?😉 (No, in fact Ivana is a very good manager and very kind and friendly and hasn’t chewed off anyone’s head yet. As far as we know.😀 )

When we worked, we worked hard and seriously. And then there was relaxation time. After 30 hours of not sleeping, the idea of fun gets really scewed. Like watching He-Man sing Heyeayea for 10 hours or the emperor in the Gladiator repeating “and again” to Maximus for 10 hours, or moving like retards to the song What is Love – yes, one does go a little (or a lot) bananas after not sleeping for two days. But preparing everything for print was easier for me this time, because that was done by my assistant Nejc Balantič, one of my participants, who is also someone who thinks sleep is for pussies.😀 Nevertheless, everyone did an amazing job. The organizers and all the coordinators, all the assistants and of course the paticipants. Oh, and by the way, thanks to Tarmorazzo, a teacher-turned-paparazzo from Estonia😀 , the official form of addressing me at these workshops is now “my grandmaster”.😀😀

Don’t forget, the exhibition is open until August 24 in Atrij ZRC SAZU in Ljubljana (Novi trg 2)! But here is a preview of the stories in the order you will see them at the exhibition.

Searching for Equilibrium by Maryna Manchenko Ever since Ana found out about her epilepsy, her life divided into two parts – before and after. She remembers being very bright and over-achieving in primary school, but the sickness brought problems with focus, self-esteem and ambitions. It changed all the relationships in her life: with classmates, with friends, with family and the most important one - with herself. Studying became harder, as well as connecting to people and keeping up with the world around her. Overpowered by stress, that made her attacks more frequent, she dropped out of high school to stay at home with her family. Now she’s 19 years old. She’s living quite a structured, organized life with her father, older brother and the cat named Jackie. Every day she wakes up early to work out, then takes a bus to Ljubljana - to attend the center for young adults. There she can dedicate herself to things that inspire her – painting and drawing. She loves mixing paints, listening to music, searching for inspiration in pictures and movies; she loves Frida, Mick Jagger, dream catchers and mandalas. On weekends she spends time with her father Renato, who works as an engine driver. Every Saturday morning they follow their own little ritual – first going to a supermarket to buy groceries for a week, then taking a coffee in a coffee shop terrace and speaking for hours. She is considering coming back to school to make her father proud, as he works so hard for their family. But she’s also having doubts. Going back can bring a lot of stress, and she’s scared that she might be not ready to handle it. Right now she’s focusing on finding her equilibrium and practicing arts that she enjoys so much.
Searching for Equilibrium by Maryna Manchenko
Ever since Ana found out about her epilepsy, her life divided into two parts – before and after. She remembers being very bright and over-achieving in primary school, but the sickness brought problems with focus, self-esteem and ambitions. It changed all the relationships in her life: with classmates, with friends, with family and the most important one – with herself. Studying became harder, as well as connecting to people and keeping up with the world around her. Overpowered by stress, that made her attacks more frequent, she dropped out of high school to stay at home with her family. Now she’s 19 years old. She’s living quite a structured, organized life with her father, older brother and the cat named Jackie. Every day she wakes up early to work out, then takes a bus to Ljubljana – to attend the center for young adults. There she can dedicate herself to things that inspire her – painting and drawing. She loves mixing paints, listening to music, searching for inspiration in pictures and movies; she loves Frida, Mick Jagger, dream catchers and mandalas. On weekends she spends time with her father Renato, who works as an engine driver. Every Saturday morning they follow their own little ritual – first going to a supermarket to buy groceries for a week, then taking a coffee in a coffee shop terrace and speaking for hours. She is considering coming back to school to make her father proud, as he works so hard for their family. But she’s also having doubts. Going back can bring a lot of stress, and she’s scared that she might be not ready to handle it. Right now she’s focusing on finding her equilibrium and practicing arts that she enjoys so much.

The Wrong Stop by Nuno Silva Ramin left his country at the age of twenty. He and his older brother managed to get fake passports, so they could get out of Iran. While growing up in Iran, Ramin always had a special talent for football. On several occasions he even played for the youth national team. When he left, Slovenia was not part of his plan, but it came in the middle of his way. Ramin was caught in Ljubljana’s airport and had to apply for refugee status. As a refugee, Ramin was moved to Ljubljana’s asylum, a place that he recalls as being similar to a prison. Without being able to do many activities or leaving at his own will, Ramin started learning Slovenian and English. In this way, he was able to obtain a degree at the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering. During the recent refugee crisis, Ramin started working as a translator, helping those who found that language was one of the most difficult barriers to cross.
The Wrong Stop by Nuno Silva
Ramin left his country at the age of twenty. He and his older brother managed to get fake passports, so they could get out of Iran. While growing up in Iran, Ramin always had a special talent for football. On several occasions he even played for the youth national team. When he left, Slovenia was not part of his plan, but it came in the middle of his way. Ramin was caught in Ljubljana’s airport and had to apply for refugee status. As a refugee, Ramin was moved to Ljubljana’s asylum, a place that he recalls as being similar to a prison. Without being able to do many activities or leaving at his own will, Ramin started learning Slovenian and English. In this way, he was able to obtain a degree at the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering. During the recent refugee crisis, Ramin started working as a translator, helping those who found that language was one of the most difficult barriers to cross.

Punk is Here to Stay by Amalia Manolopoulou You will find me if you want me in the garden unless it's pouring down with rain You will find me waiting through spring and summer You will find me waiting waiting for the fall You will find me waiting for the apples to ripen You will find me waiting for them to fall You will find me by the banks of all four rivers You will find me at the spring of consciousness You will find me if you want me in the garden unless it's pouring down with rain... (A story about a formerly homeless man on a tour of all the places in Ljubljana where the homeless sleep, hang out etc.)
Punk is Here to Stay by Amalia Manolopoulou
You will find me if you want me in the garden
unless it’s pouring down with rain
You will find me waiting through spring and summer
You will find me waiting waiting for the fall
You will find me waiting for the apples to ripen
You will find me waiting for them to fall
You will find me by the banks of all four rivers
You will find me at the spring of consciousness
You will find me if you want me in the garden
unless it’s pouring down with rain…
(A story about a formerly homeless man on a tour of all the places in Ljubljana where the homeless sleep, hang out etc.)

Fourty-four steps by Emanuele Donazza Anže is a 30 years old guy who lives in Ljubljana. He works as a baker and he loves rock music. His story is about him facing the past, the loss of parents and the challenges of the so-called Fetal alcohol syndrome disorders (FASD). FASD are a group of conditions that can occur in a person whose mother drank alcohol throughout the pregnancy; problems may include many difficulties and while they vary from one person to another, the damage is often permanent. The first time I met Anže he told me that to get to his apartment we should have climbed 44 steps. It immediately occurred to me that this would have been the title of his story. We shared a meaningful time together, going through memories, daily events and prospects for the future.
Fourty-four steps by Emanuele Donazza
Anže is a 30 years old guy who lives in Ljubljana. He works as a baker and he loves rock music. His story is about him facing the past, the loss of parents and the challenges of the so-called Fetal alcohol syndrome disorders (FASD). FASD are a group of conditions that can occur in a person whose mother drank alcohol throughout the pregnancy; problems may include many difficulties and while they vary from one person to another, the damage is often permanent. The first time I met Anže he told me that to get to his apartment we should have climbed 44 steps. It immediately occurred to me that this would have been the title of his story. We shared a meaningful time together, going through memories, daily events and prospects for the future.

Living a Full and Active Life by Ginta Salmina Tanja Kodrič is a 27 year old girl who lives in Maribor, Slovenia. When she was 17, she was diagnosed with bone cancer, and in the process of recovery they had to amputate her left leg above the knee. Even 10 years after the illness and amputation, Tanja is learning to live a different life with different dreams. She has good days and bad days, ups and downs, excruciating pain and never ending searching for strength to cope with depression. Despite all the difficulties she is facing, she is full with energy and willingness to raise voice to change the conditions for others who are in a similar situation. Tanja wants to make this world a better place for everyone. She studied Psychology at the Faculty of Arts in Maribor and a year ago she set up Association “Društvo Kinesis”. She wants to provide special programs that will help prepare people to be able to face similar situations and support them to adapt new life and challenges. And most important – Tanja wishes to INSPIRE others.
Living a Full and Active Life by Ginta Salmina
Tanja Kodrič is a 27 year old girl who lives in Maribor, Slovenia. When she was 17, she was diagnosed with bone cancer, and in the process of recovery they had to amputate her left leg above the knee. Even 10 years after the illness and amputation, Tanja is learning to live a different life with different dreams. She has good days and bad days, ups and downs, excruciating pain and never ending searching for strength to cope with depression. Despite all the difficulties she is facing, she is full with energy and willingness to raise voice to change the conditions for others who are in a similar situation. Tanja wants to make this world a better place for everyone. She studied Psychology at the Faculty of Arts in Maribor and a year ago she set up Association “Društvo Kinesis”. She wants to provide special programs that will help prepare people to be able to face similar situations and support them to adapt new life and challenges. And most important – Tanja wishes to INSPIRE others.

Without a Label by Nejc Balantič For me, trees have always been the most penetrating preachers. I revere them when they live in tribes and families, in forests and groves. And even more I revere them when they stand alone. They are like lonely persons. Not like hermits who have stolen away out of some weakness, but like great, solitary men, like Beethoven and Nietzsche. In their highest boughs the world rustles, their roots rest in infinity; but they do not lose themselves there, they struggle with all the force of their lives for one thing only: to fulfil themselves according to their own laws, to build up their own form, to represent themselves. Nothing is holier, nothing is more exemplary than a beautiful, strong tree. When a tree is cut down and reveals its naked death-wound to the sun, one can read its whole history in the luminous, inscribed disk of its trunk: in the rings of its years, its scars, all the struggle, all the suffering, all the sickness, all the happiness and prosperity stand truly written, the narrow years and the luxurious years, the attacks withstood, the storms endured. And every young farmboy knows that the hardest and noblest wood has the narrowest rings, that high on the mountains and in continuing danger the most indestructible, the strongest, the ideal trees grow. (Hermann Hesse, Trees: Reflections and Poems]
Without a Label by Nejc Balantič
For me, trees have always been the most penetrating preachers. I revere them when they live in tribes and families, in forests and groves. And even more I revere them when they stand alone. They are like lonely persons. Not like hermits who have stolen away out of some weakness, but like great, solitary men, like Beethoven and Nietzsche. In their highest boughs the world rustles, their roots rest in infinity; but they do not lose themselves there, they struggle with all the force of their lives for one thing only: to fulfil themselves according to their own laws, to build up their own form, to represent themselves. Nothing is holier, nothing is more exemplary than a beautiful, strong tree. When a tree is cut down and reveals its naked death-wound to the sun, one can read its whole history in the luminous, inscribed disk of its trunk: in the rings of its years, its scars, all the struggle, all the suffering, all the sickness, all the happiness and prosperity stand truly written, the narrow years and the luxurious years, the attacks withstood, the storms endured. And every young farmboy knows that the hardest and noblest wood has the narrowest rings, that high on the mountains and in continuing danger the most indestructible, the strongest, the ideal trees grow.
(Hermann Hesse, Trees: Reflections and Poems]

Traces by Konstantinos Chatzis This is the story about Eva (19 years old) and her younger sister Sergeja (17 years old), who are connected with a strong and unique bond. Eva faces learning difficulties and for that reason, she moved from her village to Ljubljana’s Special Educational Center Janec Levec, where she lives and attends a program for pastry making in a nearby educational center. Sergeja also attends the same program, following her sister’s path. She faced bullying for 9 years during elementary school. Today she is strong and confident, in a way that she could never hurt or be mean to anyone. During the summer, the Center operates as a hostel and it employs its pupils as part of their social inclusion program. Both girls, as they proved to be very responsible and devoted youngsters, got the chance to work during the summer in the hostel. In that period, Eva and Sergeja, who are from a community near Borovnica, have to wake up at 4am in order to be at the hostel on time. These two sisters love teasing each other and this is one way to stop when they fight. They find happiness in painting, having coffee at the river park and dreaming of passing the driving license.
Traces by Konstantinos Chatzis
This is the story about Eva (19 years old) and her younger sister Sergeja (17 years old), who are connected with a strong and unique bond. Eva faces learning difficulties and for that reason, she moved from her village to Ljubljana’s Special Educational Center Janec Levec, where she lives and attends a program for pastry making in a nearby educational center. Sergeja also attends the same program, following her sister’s path. She faced bullying for 9 years during elementary school. Today she is strong and confident, in a way that she could never hurt or be mean to anyone. During the summer, the Center operates as a hostel and it employs its pupils as part of their social inclusion program. Both girls, as they proved to be very responsible and devoted youngsters, got the chance to work during the summer in the hostel. In that period, Eva and Sergeja, who are from a community near Borovnica, have to wake up at 4am in order to be at the hostel on time. These two sisters love teasing each other and this is one way to stop when they fight. They find happiness in painting, having coffee at the river park and dreaming of passing the driving license.

Ljubljana Through His Eyes by Lola Ott Vili is 18 and throughout the year he lives in the Special Education Center Janez Levec. In the summer, Center operates as a hostel and it employs 15 young people from the Center, as part of their social inclusion programme. During those 2 months Vili works as a janitor. He studies to be a baker, but he has learning difficulties. It might be due to the fact that he is color blind and his right eye’s vision is deterioting each year. An operation is too expensive, but Vili found a way to be independent, by relying on his manual skills to bake. He is a night owl so working in a bakery fits his sleeping habits. Hostel guests and his collegues enjoy his caring and joyful company.
Ljubljana Through His Eyes by Lola Ott
Vili is 18 and throughout the year he lives in the Special Education Center Janez Levec. In the summer, Center operates as a hostel and it employs 15 young people from the Center, as part of their social inclusion programme. During those 2 months Vili works as a janitor. He studies to be a baker, but he has learning difficulties. It might be due to the fact that he is color blind and his right eye’s vision is deterioting each year. An operation is too expensive, but Vili found a way to be independent, by relying on his manual skills to bake. He is a night owl so working in a bakery fits his sleeping habits. Hostel guests and his collegues enjoy his caring and joyful company.

One Word a Day by Paula Romero Garcia Ibrahim arrived in Slovenia one and a half year ago with his family. They are Syrian refugees. They are from Aleppo, one of the cities where the war washed away buildings and people. When they ran away from the war and looked for a better life, they first reached Istanbul. The road from his hometown to Istanbul was difficult. Every 20 kilometres the bus stopped at police checkpoints, as he explained. They had to show all their papers and strip off their clothes as they were perceived as dangerous and unreliable. He stayed in Istanbul for five months. After that, somehow following the steps of other members of his family, he arrived to Slovenia. From the first moment he knew it'd be a challenge: learning new language and adapting to a new country. He worked hard to fit in his new life. After a while, he started to volunteer as a translator at the border during the refugee crisis, and later he even got a paid job as a translator helping with Arabic translations in hospitals, borders, and when needed. In the near future he will have to face other challenges as he will start studying IT; he dreams of having a job in that field. Here is his story.
One Word a Day by Paula Romero Garcia
Ibrahim arrived in Slovenia one and a half year ago with his family. They are Syrian refugees. They are from Aleppo, one of the cities where the war washed away buildings and people. When they ran away from the war and looked for a better life, they first reached Istanbul. The road from his hometown to Istanbul was difficult. Every 20 kilometres the bus stopped at police checkpoints, as he explained. They had to show all their papers and strip off their clothes as they were perceived as dangerous and unreliable. He stayed in Istanbul for five months. After that, somehow following the steps of other members of his family, he arrived to Slovenia. From the first moment he knew it’d be a challenge: learning new language and adapting to a new country. He worked hard to fit in his new life. After a while, he started to volunteer as a translator at the border during the refugee crisis, and later he even got a paid job as a translator helping with Arabic translations in hospitals, borders, and when needed. In the near future he will have to face other challenges as he will start studying IT; he dreams of having a job in that field. Here is his story.

Happiness Comes from Within by Vaike Lohk A man’s life is not a direct flight from point A to point B where destination, as well as proper measures and altitudes, have been allocated. We go through various moments and feelings while travelling through our lives. This ride can be quite bumpy for some, especially during our teen years. No one knows this better than Robert who couldn’t quite comprehend the new “flight” information and powerful feelings. He decided to search for a way to ease the pain he felt by rites of passage and he found drugs. These take you higher in your journey and Robert too found that drugs make it easier to endure the turbulence of life. Being high you don’t feel, you’re empty, simply being, standing still while the life travels past you in high speed, or gliding above everything not worrying about a thing. Being a user, Robert found he could help other youngsters make their journey lighter, by using drugs. Travelling through life costs money and the world of drugs has a lot of it, so Robert thought he could also have his share. His choice of travelling – the gliding – is costly and he needed it. He needed his dose, his gliding, and therefore he needed the money. His new journey as a drug dealer seemed like a logical choice at the time. Unfortunately, he didn’t realize then what all the gliding can do to people and, what’s even worse, he didn’t know where he was about to land his glider to…
Happiness Comes from Within by Vaike Lohk
A man’s life is not a direct flight from point A to point B where destination, as well as proper measures and altitudes, have been allocated. We go through various moments and feelings while travelling through our lives. This ride can be quite bumpy for some, especially during our teen years. No one knows this better than Robert who couldn’t quite comprehend the new “flight” information and powerful feelings. He decided to search for a way to ease the pain he felt by rites of passage and he found drugs. These take you higher in your journey and Robert too found that drugs make it easier to endure the turbulence of life. Being high you don’t feel, you’re empty, simply being, standing still while the life travels past you in high speed, or gliding above everything not worrying about a thing. Being a user, Robert found he could help other youngsters make their journey lighter, by using drugs. Travelling through life costs money and the world of drugs has a lot of it, so Robert thought he could also have his share. His choice of travelling – the gliding – is costly and he needed it. He needed his dose, his gliding, and therefore he needed the money. His new journey as a drug dealer seemed like a logical choice at the time. Unfortunately, he didn’t realize then what all the gliding can do to people and, what’s even worse, he didn’t know where he was about to land his glider to…

Brighter Future by Tarmo Tonismann Edvin is a 28-year-old Bosnian who lives and works at Tržič (Slovenia) Rehabilitation Centre. His childhood wasn’t as easy as it should have been. As an only child, his parents wished him to become a farmer like them and continue the family business. He’s very skilled in farming and worked around the farm but it wasn’t quite what he wanted. He desired to become a footballer. This didn’t go well with the family and raised a lot of tensions within. Somewhere along the way, Edvin discovered that those parents he fought with, regarding farming and football, weren’t his biological parents. As a teenager, with emotions running high and wild, he found out he was adopted. He desires to find his biological parents in hope to also find the answers to the questions still haunting him. He used to be a drug addict who now wishes nothing more than being healthy again. Edvin is not a quitter, he doesn’t give up easily.
Brighter Future by Tarmo Tonismann
Edvin is a 28-year-old Bosnian who lives and works at Tržič (Slovenia) Rehabilitation Centre. His childhood wasn’t as easy as it should have been. As an only child, his parents wished him to become a farmer like them and continue the family business. He’s very skilled in farming and worked around the farm but it wasn’t quite what he wanted. He desired to become a footballer. This didn’t go well with the family and raised a lot of tensions within. Somewhere along the way, Edvin discovered that those parents he fought with, regarding farming and football, weren’t his biological parents. As a teenager, with emotions running high and wild, he found out he was adopted. He desires to find his biological parents in hope to also find the answers to the questions still haunting him.
He used to be a drug addict who now wishes nothing more than being healthy again. Edvin is not a quitter, he doesn’t give up easily.

Thank you Maryna, Nuno, Amalia, Emanuele, Ginta, Nejc, Konstantinos, Lola, Paula, Vaike and the great Tarmorazzo!

The Power of a Good Heart

Telling everyone at the opening of a group photo exhibition in Belgrade and the press that you don’t need a lot of skill and expensive equipment to be a great photographer, that you only need a good heart, may sound like a play on human emotions, a soundbyte that I’ve invented, but I was being totally honest. I meant it and for me it is still the number one lesson that I’ve learned.

Here’s the whole story. Read until the end, you won’t be sorry.:)

The Balkan Initiative for Tolerance from Serbia and the Apis Institute from Slovenia organized a digital storytelling workshop in Belgrade from February 2 to February 8. A week of photo and video workshops. I was mentoring 14 participants set to produce a compelling, socially engaged  photo story. Heavily supported by an incredible team of organizers from the Balkan Initiative for Tolerance and Apis, we pulled off something I never thought was possible in such a short time. But with the energy they had, everything was possible. And bytheway, if you ever need a really good fixer in this area, I now know a couple of really good ones.:)

The participants of the photo workshop came from eleven countries and had a very diverse photography skills. Most of them had no experience in documentary photography, some have never really tried photography at all. But they were big-hearted people working with NGO’s on helping vulnerable groups in their countries. They understand them and feel with them. Our time was scarce, but their wish to use photography as means of empowering vulnerable groups is so heartfelt, that they’ve taken to the heart everything that I told them about building a story. We had one day to go through theory, examples etc., and I kept worrying that it was too much for one day, but they kept telling me that they understood and that it wasn’t too much. It turned out they really did memorize everything. And not just memorize, but internalized by their strong will to make use of photography in their work with vulnerable groups.

We went through story development after each one of them had decided for a story. I gave guidelines for each one of them and off they went. They spent the next day in the field, coming back in the evening to show me their work. And I was blown away.

It was an absolute pleasure to edit their stories with them the next day. With them at my side so I could listen to their suggestions and explanations I edited all the stories (except one) in one afternoon and evening, and boy, did I enjoy it! I already knew they don’t need another day of photographing if it cannot be arranged or if there is no time, because the work they brought back was more than enough for a story of 6 photos that was going to be displayed in an exhibition in Parobrod cultural center in Belgrade. When going through the photos and selecting them, editing them down towards six, all of the participants understood why I am selecting certain photos and not others. All of them also knew that sometimes you need to “kill your darlings”, because they just don’t fit into a story. All of them knew the final edit is all about the perfection of a story, the message it sends across and the feelings it evokes.

When we were done at the end of the day, I was in a state of shock, hardly believing the quality of edits that in no way whatsoever, not in a million years, not even viewing from an airplane at cruising altitude, reflected their little experiences with documentary photography. To me, this exhibition is pure phenomenon. They didn’t use expensive equipment and did use only one lens. Some of them used a phone or a compact camera. But like I said, it doesn’t matter. They had my guidelines and the sensibility to recognize powerful scenes, gestures etc.

If anyone asks me which exhibition I am most proud of, I’d say this one. It’s not my own, but it’s more than that. It’s something I would never think is possible. Stories made primarily from the heart. A testimony to what great lengths – to what ranges of quality human sensibility, a good heart can take you. And that is a gift for me. To survive in my own country I had to abandon working with my heart and submerged into the sewers of impersonal photography serving the world of capitalism. I sold my soul to make it through the month. But seeing what a heart can do gave me hope.

The opening of the exhibition was on February 8 in Parobrod and it was packed. So many people came, including the protagonists of the stories, which was really great! And not only did the photographers do an amazing job, but the video team aced it as well. That makes me happy. I think this, giving a voice to groups and individuals that have none, is the true purpose of storytelling.

Enough talk. Here are the final edits as they were exhibited in Belgrade and the descriptions that participants added . Don’t forget, the stories were made in one day.😉 Be amazed.

Aleksandar Mijušković, Serbia Darkness that becomes light, rebirth, resurrection. Like a Phoenix rising from the ashes and becoming living fire, that is how addicts in the psychotherapeutic community “The Land of Living” transform into new people. Faith in God and returning to nature as the answer to meaninglessness of addiction. Struggle within yourself, here it’s everyday life… “God did not make people for death but for salvation” Mr. Nikolaj Velimirović (A story about a commune for recovering drug addicts.)
Reborn by Aleksandar Mijušković, Serbia
Darkness that becomes light, rebirth, resurrection.
Like a Phoenix rising from the ashes and becoming living fire, that is how addicts in the psychotherapeutic community “The Land of Living” transform into new people.
Faith in God and returning to nature as the answer to meaninglessness of addiction. Struggle within yourself, here it’s everyday life…
“God did not make people for death but for salvation” Mr. Nikolaj Velimirović
(A story about a commune for recovering drug addicts.)

 

Arizona Addiction by Ana Florentina Pogangeanu, Romania Confident, strong, and funny; these are the 3 words which describe him perfectly... and he is so much more! He is religious and respectful... while his colleagues were eating, he was saying his prayers. He is a family guy; he has his parents' initials tattooed on his arms and specific numbers that remind him of his grandmother. She is the reason why he is in the rehab center, she is the one who suggested this place in Novi Sad. He is 26 years old and his story is about trucks, pleasure, and money. He used to be a drug dealer. His name is Mladen and he is an ex drug addict.
Arizona Addiction by Ana Florentina Pogangeanu, Romania
Confident, strong, and funny; these are the 3 words which describe him perfectly… and he is so much more! He is religious and respectful… while his colleagues were eating, he was saying his prayers.
He is a family guy; he has his parents’ initials tattooed on his arms and specific numbers that remind him of his grandmother. She is the reason why he is in the rehab center, she is the one who suggested this place in Novi Sad.
He is 26 years old and his story is about trucks, pleasure, and money. He used to be a drug dealer.
His name is Mladen and he is an ex drug addict.

 

"Mom's The Word" by Deborah Kelly, Ireland This is Sara, she is 25 years old. She is bright, funny, intelligent, inquisitive, caring and beautiful. Sara is Autisitic. Her best friend is probably her mom Ivana, who in turn is also her taxi driver, nurse, schedule keeper, her alarm clock, companion, her go-to for most things, but above all - her primary caregiver. Sara and her mum both live in Belgrade, Serbia. And whilst they are happy in their lives and content, Ivana’s fear is what happens to Sara when she’s gone? Who then becomes all these vital things in Sara’s life when her mom is no longer here? This fear is one that rules Ivana’s head. Through these photos I hope to highlight the intimacy and importance of this relationship to both Sara and Ivana and how beautifully it flows. These were taken on a typical Sunday afternoon, one like many before it, and I can only hope that there will be many more after it.
“Mom’s The Word” by Deborah Kelly, Northern Ireland
This is Sara, she is 25 years old. She is bright, funny, intelligent, inquisitive, caring and beautiful. Sara is Autisitic. Her best friend is probably her mom Ivana, who in turn is also her taxi driver, nurse, schedule keeper, her alarm clock, companion, her go-to for most things, but above all – her primary caregiver.
Sara and her mum both live in Belgrade, Serbia. And whilst they are happy in their lives and content, Ivana’s fear is what happens to Sara when she’s gone? Who then becomes all these vital things in Sara’s life when her mom is no longer here? This fear is one that rules Ivana’s head.
Through these photos I hope to highlight the intimacy and importance of this relationship to both Sara and Ivana and how beautifully it flows. These were taken on a typical Sunday afternoon, one like many before it, and I can only hope that there will be many more after it.

 

A Spaceship of Secrets by Emanuele Donazza, Italy Uroš is a boy with autism, he is now 15 years old. I tried to tell this story by entering his space that it is made of gestures, smiles, and routines. I saw many colored things just by standing in a corner of his mind. For people with autism there are no physical places in which they can be included. They are also not provided with the attention they need. As Uroš grows up he and his family will face this lack of social identity. Still, I’ve learnt so many things in such a short time, thanks to this amazing boy. I believe that all of us could be better human beings by exploring and knowing new planets.
A Spaceship of Secrets by Emanuele Donazza, Italy
Uroš is a boy with autism, he is now 15 years old. I tried to tell this story by entering his space that it is made of gestures, smiles, and routines. I saw many colored things just by standing in a corner of his mind.
For people with autism there are no physical places in which they can be included. They are also not provided with the attention they need. As Uroš grows up he and his family will face this lack of social identity. Still, I’ve learnt so many things in such a short time, thanks to this amazing boy.
I believe that all of us could be better human beings by exploring and knowing new planets.

 

Belgrade on the Crossroads of Past and Future by Emir Vrazalica, Serbia „A plan to pour €3.5 billion into an exclusive waterside development has some locals praising the modernisation of their long-troubled city, while others cry foul“ was the first sentence in „The Guardian“ story, named „Belgrade Waterfront: an unlikely place for Gulf petrodollars to settle. Belgrade is painfully divided over the development. Some see a prosperous future in it, others are aghast at the project’s projected alien cityscape, not convinced by the promises of economic or social benefits, and suspicious of Serbia’s relationship with Eagle Hills. The political and media struggle is between those who are supportive of, or against the project. The project itself overshadows real human stories and problems local families face after the eviction from their homes, eminent upon commencement of the construction project.
Belgrade on the Crossroads of Past and Future by Emir Vrazalica, Serbia
„A plan to pour €3.5 billion into an exclusive waterside development has some locals praising the modernisation of their long-troubled city, while others cry foul“ was the first sentence in „The Guardian“ story, named „Belgrade Waterfront: an unlikely place for Gulf petrodollars to settle.
Belgrade is painfully divided over the development. Some see a prosperous future in it, others are aghast at the project’s projected alien cityscape, not convinced by the promises of economic or social benefits, and suspicious of Serbia’s relationship with Eagle Hills.
The political and media struggle is between those who are supportive of, or against the project. The project itself overshadows real human stories and problems local families face after the eviction from their homes, eminent upon commencement of the construction project.

The Guy Inside by Jana Janaite, Latvia Aleksandar is a 23 year-old guy who was born and raised in Belgrade, Serbia. He lives with his father in the house he grew up in. In the morning he wakes up with his girlfriend by his side, and Eva Brown and Lord Maksimilian – their two beautiful young cats. Aleksandar has many different interests. Every day he takes photos, and he tries to travel as much as possible.  He is young, happy, and very smart, but more importantly Aleksandar has a story to tell. There is one thing you would never know when meeting him - he wasn’t Aleksandar all his years on earth - he was born in a female body and had had a  gender correction surgery.  Aleksandar is a transsexual man.
The Guy Inside by Jana Janaite, Latvia
Aleksandar is a 23 year-old guy who was born and raised in Belgrade, Serbia. He lives with his father in the house he grew up in. In the morning he wakes up with his girlfriend by his side, and Eva Brown and Lord Maksimilian – their two beautiful young cats. Aleksandar has many different interests. Every day he takes photos, and he tries to travel as much as possible.
He is young, happy, and very smart, but more importantly Aleksandar has a story to tell. There is one thing you would never know when meeting him – he wasn’t Aleksandar all his years on earth – he was born in a female body and had had a gender correction surgery.
Aleksandar is a transsexual man.

 

A Man on The Move by Jasna Rajnar Petrović, Slovenia He feels useless just staying at home doing nothing, he says he feels the need to be on the move. Retired in the 90s, he adds to his meager pension cheques by selling the newspaper ‘Liceulice’ to passers by in Belgrade, keeping half of the profit for himself; his record is selling for 16 days in a row. He says his life consists of two parts, the first 25 years being ‘rock’n’roll’ and, the second 25 in connection with God. His passion for music is evident. He spontaneously and randomly bursts into song and enjoys many genres, from rock to punk, jazz, and ethno. Through the association ‘Duša’, he discovered his love for acting and he has been a part of several theatre productions. You will be in for a pleasant surprise when you talk to him and hear the wisdoms that come from his vast life experiences which are almost always delivered with a smile so nice it lights up his face. His good humour and laughter is definitely infectious and spreads to everyone around him. Milutin, or as his friends call him, Milutko, is 50 years old and diagnosed with schizophrenia.
A Man on The Move by Jasna Rajnar Petrović, Slovenia
He feels useless just staying at home doing nothing, he says he feels the need to be on the move. Retired in the 90s, he adds to his meager pension cheques by selling the newspaper ‘Liceulice’ to passers by in Belgrade, keeping half of the profit for himself; his record is selling for 16 days in a row. He says his life consists of two parts, the first 25 years being ‘rock’n’roll’ and, the second 25 in connection with God. His passion for music is evident. He spontaneously and randomly bursts into song and enjoys many genres, from rock to punk, jazz, and ethno.
Through the association ‘Duša’, he discovered his love for acting and he has been a part of several theatre productions. You will be in for a pleasant surprise when you talk to him and hear the wisdoms that come from his vast life experiences which are almost always delivered with a smile so nice it lights up his face. His good humour and laughter is definitely infectious and spreads to everyone around him.
Milutin, or as his friends call him, Milutko, is 50 years old and diagnosed with schizophrenia.

 

Portrait of a Woman by Louisa Guenin, France "I chose to share the story about Milena, a 64 year-old woman who was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2008. Through these pictures I want to show how she is first and foremost an active woman, not just someone with an illness." Multiple sclerosis is an auto immune disease which causes difficulty in communication between various parts of the neurological system, leading to physical and mental issues. Milena is a retired lawyer living in Belgrade with her mother and daughter. She started feeling the first symptoms when she was on vacation in 2008. It took two years and several appointments with different doctors to find out what was going on. She kept working as long as she could when the disease was not too severe. She started to practice yoga with a former Serbian athlete, Danijela, who become her spiritual daughter. Now she practices daily on her own, she leads an active life in order to fight the illness. It took a long time for Milena to accept her disease but now she is ready to tackle it and meet other people in Belgrade who also suffer from multiple sclerosis.
Portrait of a Woman by Louisa Guenin, France
“I chose to share the story about Milena, a 64 year-old woman who was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2008. Through these pictures I want to show how she is first and foremost an active woman, not just someone with an illness.”
Multiple sclerosis is an auto immune disease which causes difficulty in communication between various parts of the neurological system, leading to physical and mental issues.
Milena is a retired lawyer living in Belgrade with her mother and daughter. She started feeling the first symptoms when she was on vacation in 2008. It took two years and several appointments with different doctors to find out what was going on. She kept working as long as she could when the disease was not too severe. She started to practice yoga with a former Serbian athlete, Danijela, who become her spiritual daughter. Now she practices daily on her own, she leads an active life in order to fight the illness. It took a long time for Milena to accept her disease but now she is ready to tackle it and meet other people in Belgrade who also suffer from multiple sclerosis.

 

Beyond The Silence by Nino Bektashashvili, Slovenia Stojan was raised in both the hearing world and the deaf world simultaneously. Early in childhood he chose music as a way of self-expression; music as the passage between two very diverse spaces. Feeling the vibes from the ground, he connects to his inner rhythm. This is the energy force for the deaf. This is how he can harmonise with his surroundings, welcoming any movement without prejudice. It involves self exploration of his deepest emotions, each of which can be a doorway to an expanse of internal energy, and lets himself move with the sound of Silence. The intention of his movements is hidden in every single muscle, every single bone, gesture, and even the pores of his skin. He lets himself feel the sensation of music and surrenders to its beats.
Beyond The Silence by Nino Bektashashvili, Slovenia
Stojan was raised in both the hearing world and the deaf world simultaneously.
Early in childhood he chose music as a way of self-expression; music as the passage between two very diverse spaces. Feeling the vibes from the ground, he connects to his inner rhythm. This is the energy force for the deaf. This is how he can harmonise with his surroundings, welcoming any movement without prejudice. It involves self exploration of his deepest emotions, each of which can be a doorway to an expanse of internal energy, and lets himself move with the sound of Silence. The intention of his movements is hidden in every single muscle, every single bone, gesture, and even the pores of his skin. He lets himself feel the sensation of music and surrenders to its beats.

 

Imagine Life in Dancing Steps by Roberto Mesir, Croatia Stojan is different from most of us! He goes after what he loves, not afraid to take chances, while we play safe! Stojan has the courage to face any obstacles that comes his way, while we are safe in our comfort zone. Stojan lives every day, every moment, positively influencing everybody around him, while we waste our days waiting for the weekend or holidays. Every life is a gift, and we should learn to count our blessings! Stojan Simić is young Serbian passionate dancer… And yes, he is also deaf!
Imagine Life in Dancing Steps by Roberto Mesir, Croatia
Stojan is different from most of us! He goes after what he loves, not afraid to take chances, while we play safe! Stojan has the courage to face any obstacles that comes his way, while we are safe in our comfort zone. Stojan lives every day, every moment, positively influencing everybody around him, while we waste our days waiting for the weekend or holidays.
Every life is a gift, and we should learn to count our blessings!
Stojan Simić is young Serbian passionate dancer… And yes, he is also deaf!

 

Silent Dreams by Safet Imamović, Bosnia and Herzegovina Roma, homeless and mute in Serbia, that’s Memet’s life, but being cheerful, happy, and strong despite this is a big challenge. His name is Memet Berisha, he has no documents here in Serbia although it is believed that he is 17. He lives alone on the street, he moved here from Macedonia with his father after his parents divorce. His mother lives far away, and he hasn't heard from her in a very long time. Mute, but his shining eyes say it all. Homeless, but his smile is magical. Different, but a part of every heart that he encounters. Memet sells magazines on the street to survive, and he calls an old car his bed.
Silent Dreams by Safet Imamović, Bosnia and Herzegovina
Roma, homeless and mute in Serbia, that’s Memet’s life, but being cheerful, happy, and strong despite this is a big challenge.
His name is Memet Berisha, he has no documents here in Serbia although it is believed that he is 17. He lives alone on the street, he moved here from Macedonia with his father after his parents divorce. His mother lives far away, and he hasn’t heard from her in a very long time.
Mute, but his shining eyes say it all.
Homeless, but his smile is magical.
Different, but a part of every heart that he encounters.
Memet sells magazines on the street to survive, and he calls an old car his bed.

 

Belegiš - The Proud by Sara Pereira Brando Albino, Portugal I found in Belegiš a story of present and future expectations sustained in a rich past. When I arrived, at the beginning it seemed to me an isolated place surrounded by an intense silence. However, I found a place where the silence is part of nature because it’s community is very much alive. Belegiš became a city scape for Belgraders and enthusiasts of its annual festival. But I could not stop thinking, how are these new dwellers contributing to the rural development of the area? They just come during weekends, but the village integrity is maintained by it’s permanent families. Today, the more I think about the concept of rural development, I find it’s foundations are the permanent inhabitants, like Zoran, that strive to keep the rural territory alive and hand down knowledge to future generations. Contributions are also made by the dreams of the town’s dwellers like Vesna. She believes that Serbia’s identity is made from the respect and knowledge of the archeological past, traditions and war heroes of the village. She has the dream of bringing more young people and outsiders to stir up Belegiš daily life and to raise the feeling of local pride amongst the villagers.
Belegiš – The Proud by Sara Pereira Brando Albino, Portugal
“I found in Belegiš a story of present and future expectations sustained in a rich past. When I arrived, at the beginning it seemed to me an isolated place surrounded by an intense silence. However, I found a place where the silence is part of nature because it’s community is very much alive.
Belegiš became a city scape for Belgraders and enthusiasts of its annual festival. But I could not stop thinking, how are these new dwellers contributing to the rural development of the area? They just come during weekends, but the village integrity is maintained by it’s permanent families.
Today, the more I think about the concept of rural development, I find it’s foundations are the permanent inhabitants, like Zoran, that strive to keep the rural territory alive and hand down knowledge to future generations. Contributions are also made by the dreams of the town’s dwellers like Vesna. She believes that Serbia’s identity is made from the respect and knowledge of the archeological past, traditions and war heroes of the village. She has the dream of bringing more young people and outsiders to stir up Belegiš daily life and to raise the feeling of local pride amongst the villagers.”

 

One Day at a Time by Ioana Pinzariu, Romania Ivan (41) moved to his new apartment only a week ago. In the last 6 years, he has spent 5 in prison. Due to the post penalty fund money from the state being delayed when he was released, he was homeless for three weeks before he found a place to live. Ivan used to live with his girlfriend, her mother, and their two cats. Heroin addiction was part of their everyday life for many years. Frequent arguments, fights, and agony over the shortage of heroin, led the family to a tragic end. His girlfriend’s mother overdosed, and soon after Ivan was imprisoned, while his girlfriend remained alone. This whole experience made him change for the better, and get himself clean. After he was released, he went back home only to find that no one was living there. Here he learned of his girlfriend’s death, she was 27 years old. A neighbor told him she left behind a 4 year-old daughter, who is now living with her relatives. His one wish is to know if he is this child’s father. This is now his motivation to fight for the future, unfortunately he can’t afford the paternity test. Today, Ivan is looking for a job as a welder, otherwise he could lose the apartment he is living in and end up back on the streets. Aside from cleaning his studio, he spends his time writing and meditating in Kalemegdan near the Victory monument, where he creates plans for the future.
One Day at a Time by Ioana Pinzariu, Romania
Ivan (41) moved to his new apartment only a week ago. In the last 6 years, he has spent 5 in prison. Due to the post penalty fund money from the state being delayed when he was released, he was homeless for three weeks before he found a place to live.
Ivan used to live with his girlfriend, her mother, and their two cats. Heroin addiction was part of their everyday life for many years. Frequent arguments, fights, and agony over the shortage of heroin, led the family to a tragic end. His girlfriend’s mother overdosed, and soon after Ivan was imprisoned, while his girlfriend remained alone.
This whole experience made him change for the better, and get himself clean. After he was released, he went back home only to find that no one was living there. Here he learned of his girlfriend’s death, she was 27 years old. A neighbor told him she left behind a 4 year-old daughter, who is now living with her relatives. His one wish is to know if he is this child’s father. This is now his motivation to fight for the future, unfortunately he can’t afford the paternity test.
Today, Ivan is looking for a job as a welder, otherwise he could lose the apartment he is living in and end up back on the streets. Aside from cleaning his studio, he spends his time writing and meditating in Kalemegdan near the Victory monument, where he creates plans for the future.

 

A Man With a Big Heart by Zozan Kotan Bayraktar, Turkey Every human has come face to face with numerous challenges, Mirko is able to fight through all the conditions he has had imposed on him trough no fault of his own. He had to drop out of primary school and at 12 years old, found himself out on the streets. The challenges and troubles he has been forced to endure, are the reason for his brilliant, infectious smile. He supports himself and his family by meagre earnings from selling magazines on the street. However, to the people, he sells more than just a magazine… He sells them love and energy too. Meeting him, it is easy to see an endless space full of love in his heart. Mirko establishes such a strong bond with others, and in doing so he never judges anyone. The bonds he builds with others keep him strong, and pull him through life. He is always free… He is free in the street, he is free at home, he is a self made man.
A Man With a Big Heart by Zozan Kotan Bayraktar, Turkey
Every human has come face to face with numerous challenges, Mirko is able to fight through all the conditions he has had imposed on him trough no fault of his own. He had to drop out of primary school and at 12 years old, found himself out on the streets. The challenges and troubles he has been forced to endure, are the reason for his brilliant, infectious smile. He supports himself and his family by meagre earnings from selling magazines on the street. However, to the people, he sells more than just a magazine… He sells them love and energy too. Meeting him, it is easy to see an endless space full of love in his heart. Mirko establishes such a strong bond with others, and in doing so he never judges anyone. The bonds he builds with others keep him strong, and pull him through life.
He is always free…
He is free in the street, he is free at home, he is a self made man.

THANK YOU Aleksandar, Ana, Debs, Emanuele, Emir, Jana, Jasna, Louisa, Nino, Roberto, Safet, Sara, Zamfi and Zozan! You rock!

 

Cara Dillon @ Okarina Festival in Bled

Although I don’t live far from the picturesque town of Bled, Slovenia, I never visited the Okarina Festival before. It is three weeks of musical performances, not pop, but ethnographic and folk music. I went to see Cara Dillon from Northern Ireland and on my arrival I was impressed by the magical setting by the lake with the castle and the island in the background. The open air concert was great. People sat in chairs and on a grassy incline in front of the stage. Here are some photos from the concert.

okarina-fotoLD-5

okarina-fotoLD-1

okarina-fotoLD-2

okarina-fotoLD-8

okarina-fotoLD-3

okarina-fotoLD-6

okarina-fotoLD-4

okarina-fotoLD-7

The 18th annual international street arts festival Ana desetnica in Slovenia ran from June 26 to July 8 in various towns across the country, but it had its biggest repertoar in its “home town” of Ljubljana, the capital of Slovenia.

For the past five years I am one of two official photographers. Here are just some of the photos from this year’s festival in Ljubljana (from shows that I was assigned to document).

Juri Caneiro (SUI/ITA)
Juri Caneiro (SUI/ITA)

Ana Desetnica 2015

Tom Greder (SUI)
Tom Greder (SUI)
Vertigo (SLO/FRA)
Vertigo (SLO/FRA)

Ana Desetnica 2015 Ana Desetnica 2015

Barabba Clown (ITA)
Barabba Clown (ITA)
Fadunito (ESP)
Fadunito (ESP)

Ana Desetnica 2015 Ana Desetnica 2015

Čupakabra (SLO)
Čupakabra (SLO)

Ana Desetnica 2015 ADLJ15-fotoLukaDakskobler-014

Bad Rabbits (LIT)
Bad Rabbits (LIT)
Bad Rabbits (LIT)
Bad Rabbits (LIT)

ADLJ15-fotoLukaDakskobler-017 Ana Desetnica 2015 Ana Desetnica 2015 Ana Desetnica 2015

Teatr Biuro Podrozy (POL)
Teatr Biuro Podrozy (POL)

ADLJ15-fotoLukaDakskobler-022 ADLJ15-fotoLukaDakskobler-023 Ana Desetnica 2015 Ana Desetnica 2015

2 Faced Dance Company (GBR)
2 Faced Dance Company (GBR)

Ana Desetnica 2015

KŠD Štumf (SLO)
KŠD Štumf (SLO)
Lonely Circus (FRA)
Lonely Circus (FRA)

Ana Desetnica 2015

The Endgame

Eventually, it’s the money that will make you or brake you. In a failing economy of utter devaluation of photography, especially documentary photography, the ones swimming up to the surface and making it big are the ones with strong external financial support from the start, e.g. the Slovenia’s front-runner: well-off parents.:)

Be thankful!

The following two stories are what I sent to WPP. They say it’s wise to send something in even if you don’t stand a chance. Your name gets seen. All right.
The first story is hot and the second one is cold. :)  The first was actually an award, paid in half; the other half was my debt.:) That’s how you do it, if you’re not a son by profession.:) The second one was self initiated and produced on scraps of money I am left with.

A man tends to his cattle next to the lake Lak de Guiers, which provides water for a big agribusiness company Senhuile/Senethanol, January 8, 2014. The company gained a lease for 20000 ha of land near the lake, where pastoral communities have been living for several centuries. The company is using the land for growing crops which require massive amount of water for irrigation, thus placing additional pressure on already low level of water security in the semi-arid zone. In addition to irrigation needs, the problem of water security is also exacerbated with inefficient irrigation due to inadequate systems used by the company, which are causing large quantities of water being evaporated daily.
A man tends to his cattle next to the lake Lak de Guiers, which provides water for a big agribusiness company Senhuile/Senethanol, January 8, 2014. The company gained a lease for 20000 ha of land near the lake, where pastoral communities have been living for several centuries. The company is using the land for growing crops which require massive amount of water for irrigation, thus placing additional pressure on already low level of water security in the semi-arid zone. In addition to irrigation needs, the problem of water security is also exacerbated with inefficient irrigation due to inadequate systems used by the company, which are causing large quantities of water being evaporated daily.
A donkey enclosure is seen in a remote village of Ndiourki in the Ndiael region of Senegal, where a big-scale agribusiness company Senhuile/Senethanol is limiting local communities' access to grazing land, January 8, 2014. In a search for new grazing land animals are increasingly moving outside of their traditional grazing spaces towards the land of farmer communities which are cultivating the area around the reserve. This is increasing the risk of conflict over the land among communities in the region. In a recent case, donkeys from Puelh communities destroyed crops in the fields of neighboring farmer communities. They were caught by the owner of the fields, who demanded a payment of 4000 Senegalese Francs /6 Eur/ per donkey in order to return donkeys to their owners and to repair the damage.
A donkey enclosure is seen in a remote village of Ndiourki in the Ndiael region of Senegal, where a big-scale agribusiness company Senhuile/Senethanol is limiting local communities’ access to grazing land, January 8, 2014. In a search for new grazing land animals are increasingly moving outside of their traditional grazing spaces towards the land of farmer communities which are cultivating the area around the reserve. This is increasing the risk of conflict over the land among communities in the region. In a recent case, donkeys from Puelh communities destroyed crops in the fields of neighboring farmer communities. They were caught by the owner of the fields, who demanded a payment of 4000 Senegalese Francs /6 Eur/ per donkey in order to return donkeys to their owners and to repair the damage.
A man visits a graveyard on the outskirts of a remote village of Ndiourki in Senegal, on January 8, 2014. The graveyard remains one of disputed issues between the villagers of Ndiourki and Senhuile/Senethanol company that aims to clear the land for their plantations by cutting threes around the village, including - according to the villagers - trees marking their sacred land. All attempts of the company to cut down the tree in the graveyard so far were stopped by the villagers who physically protected the graveyard from its destruction. Buried here are also three children who died after falling into an irrigation channel used by the Senhuile/Senethanol company.
A man visits a graveyard on the outskirts of a remote village of Ndiourki in Senegal, on January 8, 2014. The graveyard remains one of disputed issues between the villagers of Ndiourki and Senhuile/Senethanol company that aims to clear the land for their plantations by cutting threes around the village, including – according to the villagers – trees marking their sacred land. All attempts of the company to cut down the tree in the graveyard so far were stopped by the villagers who physically protected the graveyard from its destruction. Buried here are also three children who died after falling into an irrigation channel used by the Senhuile/Senethanol company.
Water sprinkles water the plantations of Senhuile/Senethanol company, additionally burdening water security in an already drought prone semi-arid region of Ndiael, Senegal. The company first started operating in Senegal with a plan to produce crops such as sweet potatoes for biofuel production. After the unsuccessful attempt of the company to set biofuels business in the Fanaye region of Northern Senegal, where it was faced with strong resistance of local population, leading to the death of two local villagers, the company moved their operation to the current location in the Ndiael region. Doing so, they have only transfered the problem from one region to another. According to recen information the company has reoriented from biofuel production to growing maize and sunflowers for oil, but what exactly is grown on the plantations remains unknown.
Water sprinkles water the plantations of Senhuile/Senethanol company, additionally burdening water security in an already drought prone semi-arid region of Ndiael, Senegal. The company first started operating in Senegal with a plan to produce crops such as sweet potatoes for biofuel production. After the unsuccessful attempt of the company to set biofuels business in the Fanaye region of Northern Senegal, where it was faced with strong resistance of local population, leading to the death of two local villagers, the company moved their operation to the current location in the Ndiael region. Doing so, they have only transfered the problem from one region to another. According to recen information the company has reoriented from biofuel production to growing maize and sunflowers for oil, but what exactly is grown on the plantations remains unknown.
A schoolboy does his homework in a school of a remote village of Ndiourki, Senegal, on January 8, 2014. With running water and solid equipment the school in Ndiourki is one of better equipped schools in the region. It has also been providing schooling for several kids from neighboring villages until the Senhuile/Senethanol plantations blocked their direct access to the school. Now children that can’t easily access the school are being educated in temporary, less equipped schools in their local villages.
A schoolboy does his homework in a school of a remote village of Ndiourki, Senegal, on January 8, 2014. With running water and solid equipment the school in Ndiourki is one of better equipped schools in the region. It has also been providing schooling for several kids from neighboring villages until the Senhuile/Senethanol plantations blocked their direct access to the school. Now children that can’t easily access the school are being educated in temporary, less equipped schools in their local villages.
A new school built by the villagers due to lack of access to the former school in Ndiourki is seen in the Comoro Village on January 8, 2014. The villagers built the school in order to secure the basic education for their children after the Senhuile/Senethanol plantation had blocked direct access to a better equipped school with running water in the village of Ndiourki.
A new school built by the villagers due to lack of access to the former school in Ndiourki is seen in the Comoro Village on January 8, 2014. The villagers built the school in order to secure the basic education for their children after the Senhuile/Senethanol plantation had blocked direct access to a better equipped school with running water in the village of Ndiourki.
Villagers of Colobane village in region Kaolac meet non-governmental organizations to discuss their options after the African National Oil Corporation (ANOC) has acquired their land in a non-transparent and allegedly illegal process. Villagers have been unsuccessfully seeking support for the injustice that happened to them through local and national channels until that day, and are getting increasingly impatient in demanding their justice and their land back. »The land of the community is our land; if you start the fight we will come and join you« were just some of the voices heard at the village meeting. In Senegal, traditional land, including majority of the land in the region of Kaolac, is not owned by the individual or a family, but is a property of local community. Therefore, anybody who wants to legally sell or buy the land needs the approval of the local Council. At this moment, there is no evidence that ANOC gained approval from the Council for their land deals, which means that the legality of their ownership over the land is seriously questioned. Furthermore, the land deals have been done in a very non-transparent manner with villagers signing blank or uncompleted papers as their agreement for selling the land. None of the villagers received a copy of the document they signed.
Villagers of Colobane village in region Kaolac meet non-governmental organizations to discuss their options after the African National Oil Corporation (ANOC) has acquired their land in a non-transparent and allegedly illegal process. Villagers have been unsuccessfully seeking support for the injustice that happened to them through local and national channels until that day, and are getting increasingly impatient in demanding their justice and their land back. »The land of the community is our land; if you start the fight we will come and join you« were just some of the voices heard at the village meeting. In Senegal, traditional land, including majority of the land in the region of Kaolac, is not owned by the individual or a family, but is a property of local community. Therefore, anybody who wants to legally sell or buy the land needs the approval of the local Council. At this moment, there is no evidence that ANOC gained approval from the Council for their land deals, which means that the legality of their ownership over the land is seriously questioned. Furthermore, the land deals have been done in a very non-transparent manner with villagers signing blank or uncompleted papers as their agreement for selling the land. None of the villagers received a copy of the document they signed.
A villager shows the land near the village of Colobane, Senegal, that has been, presumed illegally, acquired by the Italian company African National Oil Corporation (ANOC) to grow Jatropha plants for biofuels, January 10, 2014. In Senegal, traditional land, including majority of the land in the region of Kaolac, is not owned by the individual or a family, but is a property of local community. Therefore, anybody who wants to legally sell or buy the land needs the approval of the local Council. At this moment, there is no evidence that ANOC gained approval from the Council for their land deals, which means that the legality of their ownership over the land is seriously questioned. Furthermore, the land deals have been done in a very non-transparent manner with villagers signing blank or uncompleted papers as their agreement for selling the land. None of the villagers received a copy of the document they signed.
A villager shows the land near the village of Colobane, Senegal, that has been, presumed illegally, acquired by the Italian company African National Oil Corporation (ANOC) to grow Jatropha plants for biofuels, January 10, 2014. In Senegal, traditional land, including majority of the land in the region of Kaolac, is not owned by the individual or a family, but is a property of local community. Therefore, anybody who wants to legally sell or buy the land needs the approval of the local Council. At this moment, there is no evidence that ANOC gained approval from the Council for their land deals, which means that the legality of their ownership over the land is seriously questioned. Furthermore, the land deals have been done in a very non-transparent manner with villagers signing blank or uncompleted papers as their agreement for selling the land. None of the villagers received a copy of the document they signed.
Banda Samba, ex-advisor of the local Council of the region of Kaolac, shows a copy of the document, noting and describing the land sold to the African National Oil Corporation, to members of NGOs in the town of Fass, Senegal. Banda was one of the first people raising concerns over illegal land deals and land grabbing in the region. He believes that this was also the reason he was put in prison for more than one month, allegedly on the grounds of “assaulting the Council”, but without charges or proper trial. While he was in prison, the local Council has been dissolved and interim special delegation responsible directly to the President has been put in place to govern the region. During that period, the original document describing all the land that has been sold has disappeared from the Council’s archives.
Banda Samba, ex-advisor of the local Council of the region of Kaolac, shows a copy of the document, noting and describing the land sold to the African National Oil Corporation, to members of NGOs in the town of Fass, Senegal. Banda was one of the first people raising concerns over illegal land deals and land grabbing in the region. He believes that this was also the reason he was put in prison for more than one month, allegedly on the grounds of “assaulting the Council”, but without charges or proper trial. While he was in prison, the local Council has been dissolved and interim special delegation responsible directly to the President has been put in place to govern the region. During that period, the original document describing all the land that has been sold has disappeared from the Council’s archives.
Jatropha plantation used for the production of biofuels by the African National Oil Corporation (ANOC) is seen near the village of Colobane, Senegal on January 10, 2014. ANOC started to operate with the explicit aim to grow jatropha plants used for production of biofuels, and has later expaned their production to peanuts as well. The company is just one of several foreign companies which have been stimulated by unsustainable biofuels policies (particularly European Union lead) to grow crops for biofuels in Africa. These policies are supporting the use of agricultural land for production of crops to fuel the cars, instead of crops to feed the people.
Jatropha plantation used for the production of biofuels by the African National Oil Corporation (ANOC) is seen near the village of Colobane, Senegal on January 10, 2014. ANOC started to operate with the explicit aim to grow jatropha plants used for production of biofuels, and has later expaned their production to peanuts as well. The company is just one of several foreign companies which have been stimulated by unsustainable biofuels policies (particularly European Union lead) to grow crops for biofuels in Africa. These policies are supporting the use of agricultural land for production of crops to fuel the cars, instead of crops to feed the people.

And a portrait from a different category…

Mamadou Mambone stands on the land he has sold to the African National Oil Corporation near the village of Colobane after a woman from the region working for the company, persuaded him that the deal presents a positive development for his family and the village as a whole. Together with his brother, he sold more than 15 ha of land. Similar to others, they signed a blank paper, with which they allegedly sold the land. »A woman came and told me she is from the region, and that she has seen something good and wishes to bring this to our village; she promised that they will pay 20000 francs for 1 ha of land, but beside that the most important is employment they promised to provide us with« were the words of his brother, describing the way they were persuaded to sell their land to the company. Both, Mamadoue and his brother, have large families and regular income gained from employment would present much welcomed contribution to their families.
Mamadou Mambone stands on the land he has sold to the African National Oil Corporation near the village of Colobane after a woman from the region working for the company, persuaded him that the deal presents a positive development for his family and the village as a whole. Together with his brother, he sold more than 15 ha of land. Similar to others, they signed a blank paper, with which they allegedly sold the land. »A woman came and told me she is from the region, and that she has seen something good and wishes to bring this to our village; she promised that they will pay 20000 francs for 1 ha of land, but beside that the most important is employment they promised to provide us with« were the words of his brother, describing the way they were persuaded to sell their land to the company. Both, Mamadoue and his brother, have large families and regular income gained from employment would present much welcomed contribution to their families.

The cold one. It’s from the 2014 ice storm in Slovenia. No captions needed.  A tractor is covered in ice in Postojna, Slovenia, February 5 2014.Frozen-photoLukaDakskobler-003Frozen-photoLukaDakskobler-004Frozen-photoLukaDakskobler-005Frozen-photoLukaDakskobler-006A house is seen among broken trees in Postojna, Slovenia, February 5 2014.A frozen street is seen in Postojna, Slovenia, February 5 2014.A frozen street is seen in Postojna, Slovenia, February 5 2014.Frozen-photoLukaDakskobler-010 In the words of late Michael Jackson: “This is it.”

The Street

About three months ago, I decided to try something new. I got myself a Yashica twin lens reflex camera and got back to the roots. Film photography. It’s how I started and I still like it for quite a few characteristics. You think before taking the shot. You rely on your knowledge of the light. The suspense in waiting for the film to be developed. In my case, either Kodak Tri-X 400 Professional or T-Max 400 Professional. I went out on the streets and here are the first results.

yash-001 yash-015 yash-014 yash-013 yash-012 yash-011 yash-010 yash-009 yash-008 yash-007 yash-006 yash-005 yash-004 yash-003 yash-002

Best of 2014 (foreword by whoever)

2014 done, let’s recap. Here are the best photos of 2014. Not many, because I’m not working as much as before. In fact, you know what, no more sugarcoating, let’s just say it as it is. In recent months, I’ve somehow become indifferent with everything. So much so that I can let go of everything and screw it all without any bitterness and anger. I’m kind of realxed now, but I still love to tell the truth. Everything written here applies to Slovenia. I do a maximum of four to five bigger gigs a year, and some smaller paid things, while everything else just doesn’t pay the bills, not even covers production costs. It’s a meager existence, but I’ve learned to live from one job to another. In a market that favors slavery and (speaking of photography) mostly un/wellunderpaid work, I’m working with the clients that know how to go beyond family ties and friendly favors, value quality and work ethics, and have no capitalist extremist tendencies that keep photographers here struggling to survive despite the loads of work they’re getting. Oh, yes, they are getting work. That work just never reaches my ears or mailbox or whatever. I understand. It’s a dog eat dog world and popularity is the only thing (not quality) that’ll keep you on the radar. But shit, hey, I’m not a cool-looking, Indiana Jones kind of hotshot wielding a camera like a gun through some war zone – I don’t work on my sensationalist image, hence the ignorance. And I don’t have my mommy and daddy providing me with money for exotic travel and storytelling in far-off places that eventually get me noticed in some big magazines that would publish a story on a small lake in Taiwan, but not a huge conservation story and an international eco project from an unknown country like Slovenia. We’re the speck no-one notices on a map, 70% of the world is ignorant of this place and 30% know Lake Bled. Anyway, I don’t do stuff that’s been done a thousand times and that everyone does, if it means doing it solely for reference. I could, but I won’t go to Gaza that’s becoming the #1 photojournalist tourist destination unless I have a very very unique story to tell. Or any other such place. But that doesn’t even matter, because general public and general media (not so much anymore in other countries I’ve noticed) is jerking off on “popular” sensational international news (should look like an action movie if possible). Sure, it’s not easy and it’s dangerous to go there, and most international photojournalists working for big or important outlets are doing an important job there, but if you’re not working with VII, Noor, Time, New York Times, Washington Post, Reuters and other media outlets that pay you for daily coverage of the region, what are you doing? Being unpaid and in the entire flood of images coming from those regions, what the hell are you doing there, if you’re not covering a unique angle or a never before seen story? Are you building an image for yourself or are you telling stories?

It’s fairly easy to take a good picture in some exotic place or a war zone (this one not so much really, depends on what kind of picture), because (and I’m still referring to the country I live in) even a single photo of a beautiful archipelago or a totally destroyed street will make people hail it as fantastic and awesome and amazing. But this country? In a way, even Slovenians are like the 30% of foreigners who see only this country’s natural beauty worth of any praise. Everything else is like “cool, whatever”. So when debating what’s easier to do, here’s my take. If you’ve been provided with the foundations and financial support for your exotic work, if you’re covered and well equipped, it’s f***ing easy. So if you’re such a hotshot, do an amazing story in a country that’s totally boring (in your opinion) – here, in your back yard. The landscapes and exotic people won’t help you here. You’ll need content and you’ll need to notice it, package it, present it, build a story from start to finish, and please, do it without any big budget funding!

But why do it? I get it. Look at me; I did most of my stories at home. Where did that get me?:) The interest in what I do is pretty grim, the lectures I had this year were a good proof. It’s so funny to see what it did to me now that I don’t give a rat’s ass anymore. Why is it that whatever I do is almost completely ignored by professional photographic community in my country, while that same work got so much constructive favorable opinions from the biggest editorial and photography names in the world? The answer is quite a thesis, but you know what, I don’t care anymore. It’s Slovenia. In the words of Mary Anne Golon (Washington Post): “How is it possible, that with this kind of work, you’re not working anywhere?” Wrong address! From what I can see, quality counts for nothing here. I’ve won seven Slovenia Press Photo awards in just two years. Three in 2011 and four in 2013. The contest is anonymous, I sent in unpublished work, but won almost everything including overall story. Guess what: the jury was made of foreign photo editors and photojournalists. Those weren’t the only awards I got, and again it doesn’t even matter to me, because I’m not working for awards. Awards, given to me by the biggest names in photography, were my only confirmation that I’m good at it, and means of convincing employers that I’m worth hiring (of course it didn’t exactly happen:) ). They were also the only means of covering my expenses producing these stories (most of the stories weren’t done for a client). And in 2011 when the competition ended, I was broke and almost forced to quit this. The money from the awards saved me. I invested it in further important stories; I actually swung into even higher gear and produced a story that for me represents the absolute ideal of what I want from photography. I told the story about Barbara, the girl with cerebral palsy and her family, struggling with life in this failing country. When I sent the stories to the contest and won in three categories and overall, I was broke again. Winning Slovenia Press Photo was the only way to get enough exposure of Barbara’s story to push it forward and use it to help her family. People raised over 20,000 euros for them and we changed their lives. It was two months later that I realized there were no money prizes at Slovenia Press Photo 2013. I just didn’t care about it before. And that’s where it left me. No savior this time, but surely, now people (who need to know) will know how good I am at what I do, haha! And my situation only got worse. Upside down world.

Something amazing happened next. An awesome study in Slovenian mentality. People who know me and actually wish me well couldn’t comprehend why I don’t get work even if I suggest it to someone or why nothing ever comes my way through regular channels (photographer colleagues), so they had a wonderful idea. And I don’t mean it sarcastically. I really think it was a great idea, because it produced results that would ultimately bring me to terms with the way things work around here. They told me to be open about it. So I started speaking up. No more blowing smoke when someone asked how I’m doing. Sure I’m doing fine – around a month a year.:) I still didn’t spill all the beans, because that would be too much, but I did show a hint of what kind of life I’m leading. Here, you see, I discovered a strange feature of Slovenian mentality. First of, taking all of what needed to be said into account means taking responsibility – at least mental – to remember this when a job comes your way. I know because I was in the same spot and I did relay the job to a friend who really needed it back then, and it picked him up. I was happy to help. But that’s me. The thing is that responsibility is a fairly foreign concept in this country. So it’s easier to listen to what I have to say and shun it as simple wining, because that exonerates you of the responsibility, and even saves you from actual listening. There’s plenty of that running around this country. It’s not necessarily because one wouldn’t want to help, but can also be because they can’t. Needless to say, being open about it didn’t really do the trick, but I did it anyway just to say I did everything I could. However, there’s another ideology feature. Most people don’t even comprehend or even grasp the notion of not having money. They don’t understand what “I don’t have money” means and this is probably universal. You’d hear someone say: “Even if I didn’t have money, I bought a plane ticket and went travelling.” Alright, then you did have money.😉 So consequently they don’t understand that I wasn’t able to take any risks anymore (the kind I did take years ago), no risky investments or new turns in my career that would involve financial investments. So all those suggestions about starting something new have to be weighed against my financial abilities, and it amounts to very little. That doesn’t mean I’m not brainstorming though, but I’m very limited. To illustrate how this works, I told someone once that I had 120 euro/month (now I have less), and he just said: “Well, why don’t you move to London and find a job there?” Soooo, what part of 120 euro/month you don’t understand? London? 2nd most expensive city in the world? Really? See, perspectives are hard to match.

A year ago I’d be mad and bitter. Today, I laugh at it, because I accept this society as regressive and waaaaay behind markets of actually developed countries. I shed all my ambitions and I’m taking my life, although much like the teenage life dependent on my parents, as it is. I don’t give a shit anymore, and I don’t care if anyone looks at my work or not, I don’t even beat myself over not being able to produce new stories. It’s not my fault. I’ve spent 15 years investing in nothing but my work in Slovenia,the last four or five to promoting my work, and here I am. Some would say that I let them win, that I let all the ignorance defeat me. No, I didn’t. It’s not about them and me; we’re in this together. Maybe I’m just not the same kind of person. And besides, it didn’t break me. I’m totally fine. No work, no expenses. And the work that I actually do is the work that I absolutely love doing. My long-lasting cooperation with National Geographic Junior is priceless. Even in the wake of a strong financial sweep, I would never leave them. The work I do for them is scarce of course, because it is a licensed magazine and we’re limited to feature stories, but it’s still a lot of fun. Ana Monro theatre is another such client. Ana Desetnica, Ana Mraz and Ana Plamenita street arts festivals are some of the highlights of my year, awesome and funny and great to photograph. In recent years, I’ve also covered a fairytale or better yet storytelling festival and I like it a lot. There were many things that also came out of my cooperation with my editor at NG Junior, again a very rewarding experiences, which is why I am grateful for all of it. Still, most of my year, I’m jobless, but some things do come my way. Most of those (well, 99%) from Slovenia are jobs where they would like to have me working practically for free. Filtering has become a skill. The one percent this year came from Finland and that was fair and professional, and the story was great. I’m still with Demotix and Imago, but although the editors are great, I can hardly still afford covering stories for them.

There’s people who stay with you through hard times and understand you, and there are those who’d just hate to have their fun bubble burst, and do not care. The clients mentioned above value having me around and I am thankful for that. In fact there are people who continue their undying support for my work and who I am. Like my New York ‘sister from another mister’ as I call her. I do get help, although not job-wise, but in terms of promotion. Unfortunately, I still have to see the effects of all my self-promotion. But I am very very grateful for all the interest and care of all these people, and in 2014 it was also Vanja from Tednik, a show on our national TV, and Ron Haviv who’s been supporting me for all these years when I also tried to get to New York through grants here and abroad. After all of that, I think it’s time to just embrace the situation and work inside the available maneuvering space, and taking none of it to the heart anymore. It feels better. I don’t see my 2014 as a failure. I see it as optimal. Sure, yes, in the light of what others did in photography it’s nothing, but there’s no way comparing such different financial and social circumstances. Once you accept that, things get a lot easier. 2015 will be a lot different. It needs to be. It’s time for new endeavours and challenges, not neccessarily in the field of photography itself, although perhaps some of the best things in photography are just starting to happen. Like my quest into street photography with a twin lens reflex camera. Like perhaps a photo book finally. We’ll see.

Here’s how 2014 played out.

JANUARY

A man visits a graveyard on the outskirts of a remote village of Ndiourki in Senegal, on January 8, 2014. The company that bought the land for growing crops for biofuel production is planning to clear the land, including the village and this cemetery.
A man visits a graveyard on the outskirts of a remote village of Ndiourki in Senegal, on January 8, 2014. The company that bought the land for growing crops for biofuel production is planning to clear the land, including the village and this cemetery.
A schoolboy does his homework in a school of a remote village of Ndiourki, Senegal, on January 8, 2014. Kids from another village also attended this schoool. But with the land of Senhuile company now standing between the villages, they are cut off from this school and unable to attend.
A schoolboy does his homework in a school of a remote village of Ndiourki, Senegal, on January 8, 2014. Kids from another village also attended this schoool. But with the land of Senhuile company now standing between the villages, they are cut off from this school and unable to attend.
Mamadou Mambone stands on the land he has sold to the African National Oil Corporation near the village of Colobane. The company persuaded the villagers to sell their land for small amounts, promising them employment etc. They needed the land for growing jatropha, a plant used for biofuel production.
Mamadou Mambone stands on the land he has sold to the African National Oil Corporation near the village of Colobane. The company persuaded the villagers to sell their land for small amounts, promising them employment etc. They needed the land for growing jatropha, a plant used for biofuel production.

FEBRUARY

A  broken power line is seen among a forest of broken trees in Postojna, Slovenia, February 5 2014.
A broken power line is seen among a forest of broken trees in Postojna, Slovenia, February 5 2014.
Local resident are transported to their villages in an army armoured vehicle Valuk. The villages along the road to Jezersko were cut off by falling ice-covered trees.
Local resident are transported to their villages in an army armoured vehicle Valuk. The villages along the road to Jezersko were cut off by falling ice-covered trees.
Fans wait for the double Olympic champion Tina Maze on a vantage point above the main square in Črna na Koroskem, Slovenia, on Feb 25.
Fans wait for the double Olympic champion Tina Maze on a vantage point above the main square in Črna na Koroskem, Slovenia, on Feb 25.

APRIL

Romania

bestof14-ld-007 bestof14-ld-008 bestof14-ld-009JUNE

KDPM Street Theatre Company and Čupakabra perform at the Križnik's fairytale festival in Motnik, on Jun 7.
KDPM Street Theatre Company and Čupakabra perform at the Križnik’s fairytale festival in Motnik, on Jun 7.
Examining the plants at Pokljuka plateau for National Geographic Junior on June 8.
Examining the plants at Pokljuka plateau for National Geographic Junior on June 8.
Ana Desetnica festival, Kranj edition, on June 27.
Ana Desetnica festival, Kranj edition, on June 27.
Ana Desetnica street arts festival in Ljubljana, July 4.
Ana Desetnica street arts festival in Ljubljana, July 4.

NOVEMBER

Taken with a Yashica twin lens reflex camera on the streets of Zagreb, Croatia.
Taken with a Yashica twin lens reflex camera on the streets of Zagreb, Croatia.

DECEMBER

Taken during the filming of a TV piece about me in the Karst.
Taken during the filming of a TV piece about me in the Karst.
Dwarfs wait for their turn in a play in a fairytale land Gorajte near Škofja Loka.
Dwarfs wait for their turn in a play in a fairytale land Gorajte near Škofja Loka.
KAM Hram (CRO) perform during the Ana Mraz stret arts festival in Ljubljana, on December 29.
KAM Hram (CRO) perform during the Ana Mraz stret arts festival in Ljubljana, on December 29.
KD Priden možic in Čupakabra (SLO) perform during the Ana Mraz street arts festival in Ljubljana on December 30.
KD Priden možic in Čupakabra (SLO) perform during the Ana Mraz street arts festival in Ljubljana on December 30.

And that concludes our broadcast day.

Rock on!